Debunking some myths…..The pictures that I was encouraged to shoot in rural North Korea

It have now been over a month since I ventured into the mystical and isolated country of the DPRK, or North Korea that is better known. I got to shoot between 5 and 6000 images on my 11 days trip that took me all over the land. The funny thing for me is that I have posted quite a few images on my blog, Facebook and Instagram pages, and people seem surprised that the images that I have shot is from North Korea. (since they look like they could have been shot anywhere) One thing that I have not shown is the poor side of the DPRK. (The part of North Korea outside Pyongyang) The fact that the DPRK is a very poor country is well-known, and is a fact that have been depicted before. But in the media you get the impression that the “poorer look” of North Korea is how it is all over.

In this post I will show some pictures that are from the rural areas of North Korea, and it is one thing that is very important to point out. All the images that I have shot I got permission to shoot, and I even got encouraged to take them. 

I have no reason or understanding of why they did encouraged me to shoot the images. The only restrictions that I got was to: 1) not take direct  pictures of soldiers, 2) of buildings that was being built , 3) And  images of the leaders (or Pictures of leaders) should be “complete”.  Except for that , it was like anything  goes. So I think is that I get a bit frustrated when I get read news article saying “Look at the pictures North Korea do not want you to see”, or  “This photographer smuggled out these images from North Korea”. So it is important for me to emphasize that every shot is done in the open, with my local guides around, and I did no attempt to smuggle or hide anything during border crossings or in other ways. It is also important to say that some of the images in the story is shot from a moving  car by and have used telephotolensens according to the rules and regulations of North Korea.

Hope you enjoy, even if the images is not of the usual happy travel images this time.

This image is from the east part of where it is an agricultural community. Bicycle is still the primary form of transportation.

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The next is a typical farmers village. The crops of corn are green and lush. But the buildings have something to be desired.

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Next image is from the city of Wonsan , on the east coast. People are busy, and do their things.

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North Korea  is rich in minerals and natural resources. Here we see some kind of mine digging from the mountains.

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Here we have another kind of mine, located by the riverbed. Notice the worker with the ox and carriage in front  of the mine.

 

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One of the major issues that North Korea have struggled with is the power supply. On our way to the east cost they showed us four new power plants. Our guides where very proud of them. And they seem to do there job.

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When it comes to buildings in the towns in the countryside they where in many cases quite old, and had not been maintained for a while.

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A more normal set of houses would often look like this.

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And a typical view of rural North Korea looks something like this. You have a lot of mountains, and in the canyon you will find small villages. As you can see from the image, only a little bit of the land is possible to do farming on, so they use every little spot that is possible.

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You can never have a little story about North Korea without touching the subject of army and soldiers.  You can see them everywhere alongside the road, walking, hitching a ride with a truck or something, but you never see any army camps. (at least I did not…)

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So the big question is of course , where are all the soldiers.?? You see many entrances in mountains, so it is reasonable that there are camps located in mountains. But you also see a lot of more or less “improvised” huts all across the countryside. It seems logical that there is a connection here….

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So that was a little bit of images from all over the North Korean countryside. This was just a little sample of images, and to make one thing clear. Or guides where very proud of  their country.

-Ray

 

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6 thoughts on “Debunking some myths…..The pictures that I was encouraged to shoot in rural North Korea”

  1. It is a information very valuable of the images and comments.It is a incredible situation your personal experience in Korea.A big clap for you Raymond, for me, you are doing a great work! Thank you to share so emotional things.Regards-Alfonso 🙂

  2. Raymond,
    thanks for sharing these pictures with us. I have always had a keen interest in the country and would love to visit it. I also know though that most visitors only see what they want you to see. I hope you might share some more of your photos from the trip there.
    Vanessa

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