Tag Archives: Moscow

My dog has no nose…. How does it smell? Awful ….

The title is a joke from Monty Python’s Flying Circus, and of some reson I started thinking about it. When I traveled with the transsibirian railway this summer, I did it with Gadventures, an adventure  company that I have become quite acquainted with. When visiting Moscow , our local guide showed us one of Moscow’s secret rites.  At one of the subway stations there is a bronze statue of a dog, and you should touch it for good luck. So that is what we did…. When in Rome… You do as romans do…. An by the way… Embrace the bizarre  is one of the slogans  of Gadventures.

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-Ray

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Transmongolian railway

I have been on the transmongolian railway for the last four days. Moving from Moscow to Irkutsk or more precisely a beautiful little village outside Lake Baikal. More pictures to come. The train ride is quite epic, but I have to admit , it  do require some effort. Still it is just a brilliant travel between such a large country and different scenery and villages and people.  Many short stops on the way, and lots and lots of people to meet. Quite brilliant. Tomorrow it is onwards towards Mongolia. So more updates to come soon.

Image is shot at sunset yesterday, somewhere over the  Taiga.

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-Ray

Postcard from Moscow

I have just arrived in Moscow, and have met the people who I will join on the Transmongolian  train ride with tomorrow, and all seems like a brilliant bunch. We have been out and about in Moscow today, and more images is to come, but I think I start of with the most postcardy image of the Kremlin from one of the Moscow rivers bridges.

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-Ray

Picture of the day: Daily life in Arbat street in Moscow

The most famous place in Moscow without the Red Square is the Arbat street. It is quite peacefull, and have a fascinating history.

Quoting from Wikipedia it says:

“Arbat Street (Russian About this sound Арба́т ), mainly referred to as the Arbat, is a pedestrian street about one kilometer long in the historical centre of Moscow. The Arbat has existed since at least the 15th century, thus laying claim to being one of the oldest surviving streets of the Russian capital. It forms the heart of the Arbat District of Moscow. Originally the street formed part of an important trade route and was home to a large number of craftsmen.

In the 18th century, the Arbat came to be regarded by the Russian nobility as the most prestigious living area in Moscow. The street was almost completely destroyed by the great fire during Napoleon‘s occupation of Moscow in 1812 and had to be rebuilt. In the 19th and early 20th centuries it became known as the a place where petty nobility, artists, and academics lived. In the Soviet period, it was the home of many high-ranking government officials.”

The image was taken when I was visiting back in 2012

-Ray